Ruger 10/22 Trigger Job or Trigger Modification

If your careful and test your rifle out thoroughly before loading it, you should be just fine with this modification. However I do want you to be aware that there are some risks if you're not careful- The safety may not work and you may experience miss fires. If you stay around the 3-4 lb pull weight you'll be fine but if you're going for a hair-trigger you might have problems. 

 

 

I just finished the video and will get to the writeup as soon as I can.

 

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Why do a Trigger Modification?

 

The Ruger 10/22 comes with a pretty stiff trigger pull- It's about 7-8 lbs. When most people squeeze the trigger they have a tendency to pull the rifle off target.

 

In this tutorial I will show you how to lighten or reduce the trigger pull down to around 3-4 lbs. This will help most people become more accurate when shooting.  All the parts in this tutorial are stock parts or parts that came with the rifle. It will only require tools that most people already have and take about 30min worth of work.

 

If you're looking to build the ultimate competition rifle, then an after market trigger might be a good idea- They usually lighten the trigger's pull weight or make it adjustable, as well as tighten up the tolerances with shims and etc. You can find some really nice after market triggers out there for around $60. However, if you're like me and are trying to balance cost with benefit then the trigger job in this video will give you the best bang for your buck. 

 

 

 

Getting Started

 

Anytime I work on something that I'm not to familiar with I try to find a diagram of how it goes together so I can reassemble things once I've taken them apart. Here is an exploded diagram of the Ruger 10/22's trigger assembly or trigger group. You might want to print this out to use as a reference.

 

ruger 1022 trigger assembly

 

After making sure your gun is not loaded, remove the take-down screw and barrel band; then remove the action/barrel from the stock.

 

Ruger 1022 Trigger Job (1)

 

Remove the trigger assembly from the action/reciever.

 

Ruger 1022 Trigger Job (2)

 

Now dismantle the trigger assembly

 

Ruger 1022 Trigger Job (3)

 

What we are trying to accomplish?

 

Here is a look at how the hammer and seer contact and interact with one another.

 

ruger 1022 trigger job 4a

 

In the picture below you can see that I've drawn a picture of the seer and hammer. I have also drawn a line where the seer contacts the hammer. This shows that I am going to remove a small portion of the seer at this contact point.

 

Ruger 1022 Trigger Job (4)

 

Below you can see where the tip of the pencil is, if you draw a line straight down from this point you will see the area that needs to be cut off the hammer in order to lighten the trigger's pull weight. Buy removing this portion of the hammer and the small portion off the seer's contact point, we will reduce the amount of friction it takes to fire the rifle. In other words the more friction between the seer and hammer the heavier the trigger's pull weight will be, while less friction means less pull weight.

 

Ruger 1022 Trigger Job (5)

 

Working the Hammer and Seer

 

Now I am going to use a sharpening stone to grind down the areas that I showed in the drawings above. You can probably use a piece of sandpaper for this but I think the sharpening stone produces a superior result. I am using a diamond sharpening stone made for sharpening knifes. It cost $6 at the local sporting goods store. It works great and cuts parts down fast.

 

Note: Be careful not to take too much off the hammer and seer in the first feww passes. You're going to want to take a little off of both the seer and hammer and then test it out. So go easy when you're doing this.

 

Ruger 1022 Trigger Job (6)

 

I like to start on one end of the stone and run it straight back to the other side.

 

Ruger 1022 Trigger Job (7)

 

If you're having a hard time identifying whether or not you are grinding straight, use a sharpie to mark the area that you are grinding.

 

Ruger 1022 Trigger Job (8)

 

Take a couple of passes over the stone to grind away the black ink.

 

Ruger 1022 Trigger Job (9)

 

Using your eyes... look to see if the top of the hammer and the grinding to ink transition line is parallel to one another. In the picture below you can see that my grinding line is not parallel to the top/bottom of the hammer and that the tapering line slopes downward toward the tool I'm pointing with. This means that I need to do a better job of keeping the hammer straight when grinding it on the sharpening stone.

 

Ruger 1022 Trigger Job (10)

 

Now that I've taken a bit off the hammer and staightend the grinding line out, I'm going to grind down the seer's contact point.

 

Ruger 1022 Trigger Job (11)

 

Ruger 1022 Trigger Job (12)

 

Preliminary Trigger pull Testing

 

Now that I've taken a bit off the seer and hammer's contact points, I am going to reassemble the trigger, seer, hammer, hammer spring, and the pins into the trigger guard or housing that holds the trigger assembly/group together. There's no need to reassemble the whole trigger assembly with all it's parts to test the trigger's pull.

 

Here is a little trick that will speed up the trigger reassembly process. I've got a piece of weed-whacker line that I use to pre-assemble the trigger before putting it into the trigger guard. 

 

Ruger 1022 Trigger Job (13)

 

Ruger 1022 Trigger Job (14)

 

The weed-whacker line holds the trigger and seer together while putting the parts back into the trigger guard.

 

Ruger 1022 Trigger Job (15)

 

Now just take the pin and push the weed-whacker line out.

 

Ruger 1022 Trigger Job (16)

 

Now that the main parts are put back together, pull the hammer back and pull the trigger. If the trigger pull is still heavier than you want it to be dis-assemble the assembly for more grinding  work.

 

Ruger 1022 Trigger Job (17)

 

More Hammer and Seer Adjusting

 

Here I am working on the seer by grinding a little more off the seer's hammer contact point.

 

Ruger 1022 Trigger Job (18)

 

I've taken more off the hammer and you can see that there is a substantial amount of the hammer's contact point removed now. Sorry it's not a better picture.

 

ruger 1022 trigger job 19a

 

Here is a better look of where the hammer has been ground down.

 

Ruger 1022 Trigger Job (19)

 

I'm going to clean things off with a little gun cleaner/lube for the next test.

 

Ruger 1022 Trigger Job (20)

 

I reassembled the parts for the next pull test and surprisingly it feels perfect!

 

I was able to get the right amount of pull on the second try, but if it takes you a bit longer don't fret, just take a little off at a time and you'll eventually get there.

 

Ruger 1022 Trigger Job (21)

 

Cleaning and polishing the Trigger parts

 

The areas that I've just grounded away are a bit rough and where I'm pointing is where the hammer contacts the seer during operation. So I am going to pollish this rough spot down before putting the gun back together again.

 

Ruger 1022 Trigger Job (22)

 

First I will use some 600 grit sandpaper and then move to 1,000 grit. You don't have to work it too much, just enough to make it smooth to the touch.

 

Ruger 1022 Trigger Job (23)

 

In the picture below you can see that I've smoothed the area out so there are no hard lines. Now it is ready for polish.

 

Ruger 1022 Trigger Job (24)

 

I just used a cotton rag and some polishing compound to give the hammer a little bit more smoothness.

 

Ruger 1022 Trigger Job (25)

 

Testing the Trigger for Misfires and Safety Effectiveness.

 

After reassembling the rifle, pull the bolt back hard, put the safety on safe, and then pull hard on the trigger. If the safety is working properly and the hammer doesn't fire it is a good sign that you did everything correctly and can move on to the next test. However, if the hammer fires while the safety is on you've probably over-worked or over ground the hammer and seer. I'm not going to cover fixing the problem in this tutorial but basically you have to go back to the hammer and seer and increas the size of the contact points again. This is done by grinding the points back into the hammer and seer. The alternative fix is to buy an aftermarket trigger and install that into your rifle.  

 

 

Ruger 1022 Trigger Job (26)

 

If you safety checks out, pull your bolt back hard and test the tigger out. Do it about 10 times and if you feel good about what you've just accomplished, you're done!

 

Ruger 1022 Trigger Job (27)

 

let me know if you have any comments or questions about this tutorial you can email me or write a comment below.

Comments  

 
+1 #27 Where To Download 2014-03-21 11:52
This website was... how do you say it? Relevant!! Finally I've found something
that helped me. Appreciate it!
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0 #26 DJH Gray 2013-02-22 14:04
Quote:
Dang! I was really hoping you'd be able get it fixed without having to buy anything. If you can, leave a post in these comments about the new hammer and sear kit you're installing so others with the same problem will know how to fix it.

Thanks for the information and keeping us all updated,
Mark


Okay so I am pretty sure the only problem I had here was I ground the sear too much when I should have worked the hammer a bit more instead and after grinding the hammer back like in the video you posted to fix it it meant the sear ended up being too high to contact the safety, I have heard of people putting JB Weld on the bottom of it or hitting it with a hammer on an anvil make it a bit longer so it contacts the safety again. I think the "heavy" feeling was just me getting used to the feel of the bolt which is still a little heavy since the rifle is only been fired about 100 times since I bought it.

The Power Custom kit I bought was from Hawk Tech Arms and it was a drop in part except for in the instructions it says you may need to stone the bottom of the sear to fit into the safety as it may not fit, for mine it seemed just right so I left it and tested it a few times with the safety on and bumping the butt on the ground etc. I am pretty happy with the parts as the trigger pull is very good now but it does have a fair amount of pretravel which I might try take out since it seems a bit excessive, I believe there are a few ways of doing this. The other option is to buy one of the Adjustable Hammer and Sear kits where you can adjust how much pretravel and overtravel there is.

All in all if you are careful the mod here would probably be just as good as an aftermarket though.
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0 #25 Species 2013-02-18 19:50
Great tutorial. Did this on 2 10/22's over the weekend. First one I took too much off the hammer and had the recut more contact surface in on the hammer. It appeared to be double firing based on my dry cycling and firing. After the rework it ended up being almost perfect. Way better than factory. The second trigger job only took 45 mins and it turned out great on the first try. Thanks for posting this.

Was curious if anyone has a way of testing how well the new trigger would handle an accidental drop. I banged mine around a little after the trigger work and didn't have issues, but I don't want to break anything.
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0 #24 Administrator 2013-02-17 20:47
Quoting DJH Gray:
Quote:
I've heard of similar issues from the hammer not engaging the sear during cycling. However, it you're experiencing a "heavy" feeling I have no idea what could be causing that. Let me know what you find out what's going on. Here is a video that eplains how to fix an over-worked trigger- http://youtu.be/Zt6B4aS-iYQ.

Good Luck,
Mark


Sorry to take so long to reply, I had seen the video you posted and tried what he did but I ended up not getting anywhere as the safety now doesn't work so I've bought myself a Power Custom Hammer and Sear kit and I'll put that in instead.



Dang! I was really hoping you'd be able get it fixed without having to buy anything. If you can, leave a post in these comments about the new hammer and sear kit you're installing so others with the same problem will know how to fix it.

Thanks for the information and keeping us all updated,
Mark
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
0 #23 DJH Gray 2013-02-12 02:50
Quote:
I've heard of similar issues from the hammer not engaging the sear during cycling. However, it you're experiencing a "heavy" feeling I have no idea what could be causing that. Let me know what you find out what's going on. Here is a video that eplains how to fix an over-worked trigger- http://youtu.be/Zt6B4aS-iYQ.

Good Luck,
Mark


Sorry to take so long to reply, I had seen the video you posted and tried what he did but I ended up not getting anywhere as the safety now doesn't work so I've bought myself a Power Custom Hammer and Sear kit and I'll put that in instead.
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
0 #22 Administrator 2013-02-01 20:18
Quoting JB:
Performed a trigger job as shown here on my new model 10/22 target variety. Worked out great!!!

Ruger claims the latest bull-barrel model has a target trigger, but it still had way to much creep, gritty feel, and excessive pull for me. Not anymore! :P

I managed to achieve right at 2 lbs with much, much cleaner take-up and very crisp break. I used Gatco diamond hones that I have for sharpening knives - these worked very well. You only need the fine grit and the polishing stone with a little oil. I attribute much of the smoothness I achieved to the polishing.

I took a little metal off the seat and face of the hammer below the notch, and then polished them to a fine surface. This alone made a big difference in weight, but not in feel. So then I took a very limited amount off the tip of the sear and polished that too.

While I was in there I also polished the face of the hammer that the bolt contacts during re-cocking, and I put a healthy radius on the bottom rear edge of the bolt (helps action smoothness and cocking effort considerably).

In the end, it still can't compete with a 2-stage KIDD, but it's about on par with a Volquartsen, which is impressive for stock parts (or maybe I just got lucky).

Anyway, HUGE thanks for the great instructions! You saved me about $250, and gave me a great sense of satisfaction.

P.S. - This was the new model hammer with the integral bushings, and the plastic trigger housing. I had my doubts about the plastic housing initially, but I am now believing it may be superior to the old cast aluminum (obviously still not on par with a CNC milled part).

Thanks again!


Hey, thanks for the feedback. I haven't seen the new plastic trigger assembly housings. I'm sure they're fine, there's a lot of good reliable plastic guns out there these days.

I'm still procrastinating my bedding video but I'll get it up when I can- That's a great little mod that improved my accuracy about 15%.

Thanks,
Mark
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-1 #21 Administrator 2013-02-01 18:54
Quoting DJH Gray:
Hi Mark, I did all of the mods you have on here yesterday (took me a while but I got there in the end) and I went to test fire it today and it fires a shot and chambers the next round fine but won't fire the next shot without pulling the bolt back and ejecting the unfired round. Did I do something wrong? I polished the bolt but somehow it seems almost heavier, did I put it back together wrong? Or is it something else? Thanks


I've heard of similar issues from the hammer not engaging the sear during cycling. However, it you're experiencing a "heavy" feeling I have no idea what could be causing that. Let me know what you find out what's going on. Here is a video that eplains how to fix an over-worked trigger- http://youtu.be/Zt6B4aS-iYQ.

Good Luck,
Mark
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
0 #20 JB 2013-02-01 00:42
Performed a trigger job as shown here on my new model 10/22 target variety. Worked out great!!!

Ruger claims the latest bull-barrel model has a target trigger, but it still had way to much creep, gritty feel, and excessive pull for me. Not anymore! :P

I managed to achieve right at 2 lbs with much, much cleaner take-up and very crisp break. I used Gatco diamond hones that I have for sharpening knives - these worked very well. You only need the fine grit and the polishing stone with a little oil. I attribute much of the smoothness I achieved to the polishing.

I took a little metal off the seat and face of the hammer below the notch, and then polished them to a fine surface. This alone made a big difference in weight, but not in feel. So then I took a very limited amount off the tip of the sear and polished that too.

While I was in there I also polished the face of the hammer that the bolt contacts during re-cocking, and I put a healthy radius on the bottom rear edge of the bolt (helps action smoothness and cocking effort considerably).

In the end, it still can't compete with a 2-stage KIDD, but it's about on par with a Volquartsen, which is impressive for stock parts (or maybe I just got lucky).

Anyway, HUGE thanks for the great instructions! You saved me about $250, and gave me a great sense of satisfaction.

P.S. - This was the new model hammer with the integral bushings, and the plastic trigger housing. I had my doubts about the plastic housing initially, but I am now believing it may be superior to the old cast aluminum (obviously still not on par with a CNC milled part).

Thanks again!
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
0 #19 DJH Gray 2013-01-23 19:42
Hi Mark, I did all of the mods you have on here yesterday (took me a while but I got there in the end) and I went to test fire it today and it fires a shot and chambers the next round fine but won't fire the next shot without pulling the bolt back and ejecting the unfired round. Did I do something wrong? I polished the bolt but somehow it seems almost heavier, did I put it back together wrong? Or is it something else? Thanks
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
+2 #18 Administrator 2013-01-14 18:20
Quoting Ken:
Just a small note, you weren't 'grinding, you were lapping or stoning, picky picky picky, I was a Tool & Cutter Grinder for 35 years so what can I say That aside, VERY VERY VERY good instructions. I especially like the trick of the weed wacker line, in-genius. :-) Also for the stoning you can use a oil stone, it'll give a better finish right off the bat, then hit it with a India Oil Stone and a bit of 1200 - 2000 grit carbide paper or Crocous Cloth and it'll be like a piece of glass. Be sure to use a little oil at the same time.


Hey, I always welcome constructive criticism and correction:-) so thanks for the heads-up! I wish I could take credit for the weed-whacker line idea but I got that off of someone else.

Thanks for the advice,
-Mark
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